Hot Tamales!

Insects are no longer just street food in Mexico. They were eaten in pre-Hispanic times because meat wasn’t available and, later, became sustenance for the poor. However, they’re now seen as top end and are present on menus at some of the country’s top restaurants. Click here for the full story and checkout the video below that asks whether eating insects can save the world!

Still with us? Click here for some recipes.

Hasta la próxima!

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Hot Tamales!

Summer’s officially over now and the nights are beginning to draw in. It’s a season for traditional shepherd’s pie. Our friends at MexGrocer, whom we profiled back in June, suggest that the dish can autumn-proof you even more if you make it the Mexican way! A little chilli and a few peppers will take the chill off, especially in those wide, windy spaces north of the Borders! You can find MexGrocer’s version below:

Mexican Shepherd’s Pie

Ingredients

1 1/2 lbs ground beef
1 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp chili powder
1/4 tsp pepper
1 (15 oz) can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 (14.5 oz) can diced tomatoes with mild green chilies, drained
1 (11-ounce) can whole kernel corn, drained
1 (10 oz) can enchilada sauce
4 green onions, chopped
1/2 cup fresh coriander, minced
1 (8.5 oz) package cornbread/muffin mix
2 eggs
1 cup shredded Mexican cheese
sour cream, for garnish

Method

In a large flat pan, brown the ground beef mince. Add cumin, salt, chili powder and pepper.

Transfer to a casserole pot and top with beans, tomatoes, corn, enchilada sauce, onions and coriander. Cook on low for 6-8 hours. In a small bowl, combine muffin mix with eggs. Spoon over the meat mixture. Cover and cook for 1 hour. Sprinkle with cheese, cover and let stand 5 minutes. Serve with sour cream.

Hasta la próxima!

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Hot Tamales!

It wasn’t that long ago that outside Mexico mole and chipotle were strange foreign words. Who knew they were edible? Now there’s Chamoy, the next mystery salsa on everyone’s lips. If chipotle – made from smoked jalapeño peppers – was the spicy, hot Latin you had a fling with in Acapulco, then Chamoy is the sweet, sometimes sour, lover you had to invite home. Chamoy sauce is made from fruit pulp, usually apricot, mixed with lime, spices, and chiles. It is usually in the form of a paste, less often as a liquid. A big favourite in Mexico and, increasingly, north of the border are apples covered with Chamoy. But don’t stop there. Chamoy tastes great with chips, or corn and, even better, Rick Bayliss’s version paired with a tuna ceviche. Bayliss, in case you don’t follow the foodies, is an American chef who specializes in traditional Mexican cuisine. Here’s his recipe to try at home.

Hasta la próxima!

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